1 день

Текущая серия

1 день

Самая длинная серия

    0

    Уведомления

    personal profile entry

    Вход

    В настоящее время вы не в сети.

    Treasure Island-Robert

    Автор книги Louis Stevenson

    Время прослушивания 03:32, Дата публикации

    Продвинутый уровень

    Фантастика

    Субтитры

    Пометить как прочитанное

    Сохранить страницу

    Поделиться публикацией

    Сообщить об ошибках

    📚 Функция субтитров доступна только для пользователей, которые вошли в свою личную учетную запись. Зарегистрироваться сейчас

    It  was  not  very  long  after  this  that  there  occurred  the  first  of  the  mysterious  events  that  rid  us  at  last  of  the  Captain,  though  not,  as  you  will  see,  of  his  affairs.  It  was  a  bitter  cold  winter  with  long  hard  frosts  and  heavy  gales,  and  it  was  plain  from  the  first  that  my  poor  father  was  little  like  to  see  the  spring.  He  sank  daily,  and  my  mother  and  I  had  all  the  in  upon  our  hands  and  were  kept  busy  enough  without  paying  much  regard  to  our  unpleasant  guest.  It  was  1  January  morning,  very  early,  a  pinching  frosty  morning,  the  COVID  all  grey  with  whore  frost,  the  ripple  lapping  softly  on  the  stones,  the  sun  still  low  and  only  touching  the  hilltops  and  shining  far  to  seaward.  The  captain  had  risen  earlier  than  usual  and  set  out  down  the  beach,  his  cutlass  swinging  under  the  broad  skirts  of  the  old  blue  coat,  his  brass  telescope  under  his  arm,  his  hat  tilted  back  upon  his  head.

    I  remember  his  breath  hanging  like  smoke  in  his  wake  as  he  strode  off  and  the  last  sound  I  heard  of  him  as  he  turned  the  big  rock  was  a  loud  snort  of  indignation,  as  though  his  mind  was  still  running  upon  Doctor  Live.  See.  Well,  mother  was  upstairs  with  father  and  I  was  laying  the  breakfast  table  against  the  Captain's  return  when  the  parlor  door  opened  and  a  man  stepped  in  on  whom  I  had  never  set  my  eyes  before.  He  was  a  pale,  talllowy  creature,  wanting  two  fingers  of  the  left  hand,  and  though  he  wore  a  cutlass,  he  did  not  look  much  like  a  fighter.  I  had  always  my  eye  open  for  seafaring  men  with  one  leg  or  two,  and  I  remember  this  one  puzzled  me.

    He  was  not  sailorly,  and  yet  he  had  a  smack  of  a  sea  about  him  too.  I  asked  him  what  was  for  his  service,  and  he  said  he  would  take  rum.  But  as  I  was  going  out  of  the  room  to  fetch  it,  he  sat  down  upon  a  table  and  motioned  me  to  draw  near.  I  paused  where  I  was  with  my  napkin  in  my  hand.  Come  here,  sonny,  says  he  come  nearer  here.

    I  took  a  step  nearer.  Is  this  here  table  for  my  mate  Bill?  He  asked  with  a  kind  of  Lear.  I  told  him  I  did  not  know  his  mate  Bill.  And  this  was  for  a  person  who  stayed  in  our  house,  whom  we  called  the  Captain.

    Well,  said  he,  my  mate  Bill  would  be  called  the  Captain  as  like  as  not.  He  has  a  cut  on  one  cheek  and  a  mighty  pleasant  way  with  him,  particularly  in  drink  has  my  mate  Bill.  We'll  put  it  for  argument  like  that.  Your  captain  has  a  cut  on  one  cheek  and  we'll  put  it,  if  you  like,  that  that  cheek's  the  right  one.  Ah.

    Well,  I  told  you.  Now,  is  my  mate  Bill  in  this  hear  house?  I  told  him  he  was  out  walking.  Which  way,  sonny?  Which  way  is  he?

    Gone.  And  when  I  have  pointed  out  the  rock  and  told  him  how  the  captain  was  likely  to  return  and  how  soon  and  answered  a  few  other  questions.  Ah,  said  he,  this'll  be  as  good  as  German.  Drink  to  my  mate  Bill.  The  expression  of  his  face  as  he  said  these  words  was  not  at  all  pleasant.