1 день

Текущая серия

1 день

Самая длинная серия

    0

    Уведомления

    personal profile entry

    Вход

    В настоящее время вы не в сети.

    The Queen of Nothing

    Автор книги Holly Black

    Время прослушивания 04:20, Дата публикации

    Продвинутый уровень

    Фантастика

    Субтитры

    Пометить как прочитанное

    Сохранить страницу

    Поделиться публикацией

    Сообщить об ошибках

    📚 Функция субтитров доступна только для пользователей, которые вошли в свою личную учетную запись. Зарегистрироваться сейчас

    I,  Jude  Duarte,  high  Queen  of  Elf  haman  exile,  spend  most  mornings  dozing  in  front  of  daytime  television,  watching  cooking  competitions  and  cartoons,  and  reruns  of  a  show  where  people  have  to  complete  a  gauntlet  by  stabbing  boxes  and  bottles  and  cutting  through  a  whole  fish.  In  the  afternoons,  if  he  lets  me,  I  train  my  brother  Oak  knights.  I  run  errands  for  the  local  fairies.  I  keep  my  head  down,  as  I  probably  should  have  done  in  the  first  place.  And  if  I  curse  Carden,  then  I  have  to  curse  myself,  too,  for  being  the  fool  who  walked  right  into  the  trap  he  set  for  me.

    As  a  child,  I  imagined  returning  to  the  mortal  world,  turin  and  Vivie  and  I  would  rehash  what  it  was  like  there,  recalling  the  scents  of  fresh  cut  grass  and  gasoline,  reminiscing  over  playing  tag  through  neighborhood  backyards  and  bobbing  in  the  bleachy  chlorine  of  summer  pools.  I  dreamed  of  iced  tea  reconstituted  from  powder  and  orange  juice  popsicles.  I  longed  for  mundane  things  the  smell  of  hot  asphalt,  the  swag  of  wires  between  street  lights,  the  jingles  of  commercials  now  stuck  in  the  mortal  world  for  good.  I  miss  fairyland  with  a  raw  intensity.  It's  magic.

    I  long  for,  magic  I  miss.  Maybe  I  even  miss  being  afraid.  I  feel  as  though  I  am  dreaming  away  my  days.  Restless,  never  fully  awake,  I  drum  my  fingers  on  the  painted  wood  of  a  picnic  table.  It's  early  autumn,  already  cool  in  Maine.

    Late  afternoon  sun  dapples  the  grass  outside  the  apartment  complex  as  I  watch  Oak  play  with  other  children  in  the  strip  of  woods  between  here  and  the  highway.  They  are  kids  from  the  building,  some  younger  and  some  older  than  his  eight  years,  all  dropped  off  by  the  same  yellow  school  bus.  They  play  a  totally  disorganized  game  of  war,  chasing  one  another  with  sticks.  They  hit  as  children  do,  aiming  for  the  weapon  instead  of  the  opponent,  screaming  with  laughter  when  a  stick  breaks.  I  can't  help  noticing  they  are  learning  all  the  wrong  lessons  about  swordsmanship.

    Still,  I  watch,  and  so  I  notice.  When  Oak  uses  glamour,  he  does  it  unconsciously.  I  think  he's  sneaking  toward  the  other  kids,  but  then  there's  a  stretch  with  no  easy  cover.  He  keeps  on  toward  them,  and  even  though  he's  in  plain  sight,  they  don't  seem  to  notice.  Closer  and  closer,  with  the  kids  still  not  looking  his  way.

    And  when  he  jumps  at  them,  sticks  swinging,  they  shriek  with  wholly  authentic  surprise.  He  was  invisible.  He  was  using  glamour,  and  I  jeest  against  being  deceived  by  it,  didn't  notice  until  it  was  done.  The  other  children  just  think  he  was  clever  or  lucky.  Only  I  know  how  careless  it  was.

    I  wait  until  the  children  heed  to  their  apartments.  They  peel  off  one  by  one  until  only  my  brother  remains.  I  don't  need  magic,  even  with  leaves  underfoot  to  steal  up  on  him.  With  a  swift  motion,  I  wrap  my  arm  around  Oak's  neck,  pressing  it  against  his  throat  hard  enough  to  give  him  a  good  scare.  He  bucks  back,  nearly  hitting  me  in  the  chin  with  his  horns.

    Not  bad.  He  attempts  to  break  my  hold,  but  it's  half  hearted.  He  can  tell  it's  me  and  I  don't  frighten  him.  I  tighten  my  hold.  If  I  press  my  arm  against  his  throat  long  enough,  he'll  black  out.

    He  tries  to  speak,  and  then  he  must  start  to  feel  the  effects  of  not  getting  enough  air.  He  forgets  all  his  training  and  goes  wild,  lashing  out,  scratching  my  arms  and  kicking  against  my  legs.  Scratching  my  arms  and  kicking  against  my  legs.  Making  me  feel  awful.  I  wanted  him  to  be  a  little  afraid.

    Scared  enough  to  fight  back.  Not  terrified.